Unship

My implementer has recently joined after having worked extensively with another ERP software brand. While in the process of working his way through the product, he asked me how to Unship a Sales Line Item. I told him that the only way to do it was as a reversing Journal entry. He said that this was unusual, and that his other software had an “Unship” feature out-of-the-box, that could be used to reverse all shipments back to a certain point, allowing the user an escape mechanism, if a certain Line Item was accidently shipped. He wanted me to check into this further, so I am. Was I wrong? Has anybody come up with another way to do this?

Providing that the sales-order is shipped but not invoiced yet, the solution is simple: Let’s assume that you a quantity of 10 times item “1976-W”. After posting the shipment you have quantity=10, quantity to ship = 0, Qty. Shipped Not Invoiced = 10 Now the customer returns 3 items. What you do now is simply correct the quantity from 10 to 7. As a result “quantity to ship” will be set to -3 and with the next posting of shipment this amount (-3) will be added to the stock and everybody is happy. Marcus Fabian phone: +41 79 4397872 m.fabian@thenet.ch

Hi Marcus! Thanks for the quick reply. The situation we are trying to replicate is where a clerk would accidently (of course) ship the wrong line. I couldn’t produce your solution without creating a new line in the order with a negative “quantity”. Navision would not let me change the original order quantity. And creating a new line in the sales order, while being a good audit trail, isn’t exactly what the customer would like to see on his invoice. I would appreciate any additional feedback you might have.

You can’t enter a quantity that is less than what You have shipped. You must also invoice the lines that You have shipped. Don’t try to make any modifications that undo a shipment that has not been invoiced. I pretty sure You will end up with a wrong inventory value. My reccomendation is to add the second line with the negative quantity. Then ship and invoice the two lines. In that way You will get the right inventory and the audit trail. After a sales line has been fully shipped and invoiced You can delete it. In that way the customer won’t have to see what You clerk has been up to. Hope that helpes.

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You can’t enter a quantity that is less than what You have shipped.


You are right, Lars. Allowing negative shipment is a feature I have specially implemented for a couple of customers. Making a second line wouldn’t look good on the invoice so I recommend to incoice the whold order, Credit-Memo the order and create a new correct invoice. Marcus Fabian phone: +41 79 4397872 m.fabian@thenet.ch

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Originally posted by fabian: Making a second line wouldn’t look good on the invoice so I recommend to incoice the whold order, Credit-Memo the order and create a new correct invoice.


Just invoice the correction line. Then delete it. After that You invoice the rest of the order and the customer won’t have to see what You have done. But do whatever. Both ways will work fine. Rgds //Lars

Quote Just invoice the correction line. WARNING Only do this if after Invoicing the Whole Order! If you Delete One Invoiced Line from a Shipped not Invoiced Order Navision give an Error about the deleted line! Or use the get shipments function to get around this. Also the Invoices will both apear on the customer statement! David Cox MindSource (UK) Limited Navision Solutions Partner Email: david@mindsource.co.uk Web: www.mindsource.co.uk

Matt, Perhaps your implementer is used to work with batch processing software, where a transaction is buffered before actually posted. As long as the buffer is not posted, you can change things. You should point him at the (simple) fact that Navision is a real-time processing system. The moment you issue Post Shipment, all underlying transactions take place also (think of the Customer and Item Ledger entries here). By this real-time processing, you always have actual data available for your stocks, item availability, customer balance and so on. Furthermore, it can be justified to see a (posted) shipment as final. From a system point of view, this transaction has taken place and the items have left the company. If it was by mistake, you will have to tell the system that the goods have returned in the same way as you would handle physical returns. And. not to forget, auditors do like this method of having irreversible transactions. When you get a serious audit, you will be pleased to show the careful way of tracking goods movements. Auditors get very nervous when changes and “corrections” can be done without leaving a trace of how these were done, and this surely will put at least a “suspect” label on you. John