Nameconvention of splitted fbk-files

Hi all, I got a backup from a customer which I want to import into a database, but I got 2 cd’s with 3 files (I assume they belong together): Cd1: Backup.fbk Cd2: Backup.fbk and Backup2.fbk I copied them into one directory and renamed them to “Backup.fbk”, “Backup2.fbk” and “Backup3.fbk”, but when importing the first file Navision doesn’t find the other 2 files. I’m importing from “c:\Databases\2.60\Clientname” and Navision searches for a next part named “Backup.fbk” in “c:\Databases\2.61\Clientname”, but this path doesn’t exist. How must I rename the files to get them imported? Thanks, Alex

Splitted fbk files? Never hear that before. Maybe every company is back-uped separetly…

Navision splits the *.fbk-files if the backup would create a file that is large than permittet by the file system. If you are backing up to a FAT-system, the maximum size is 2 GB, so if the backup would be 3 GB, Navision creates 2 files. But I forgot how Navision names the 2 files… But now I found out, that my client tried to fool me by sending 2 identical files. If I simply import the files from CD 2 everything works fine. So Navision simply adds a number (starting with 2) to all additional backup files. Alex

This has been a feature of Navision since the begining, shame on you Emiel [;)][8D] You can Trick Navision into reading the files a number of ways. The easiest of course is to ask the customer how they created the files, and then duplicate that method. But if you don’t know, then …

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I’m importing from “c:\Databases\2.60\Clientname” and Navision searches for a next part named “Backup.fbk” in “c:\Databases\2.61\Clientname”, but this path doesn’t exist.


In this case just create the drectory, “c:\Databases\2.61\Clientname” and put the next file there. In Navision each file stores the name of the next file it is looking for, so you will have to wait for the messages one at a time. The exact same method is used for creating the multi part databases.

HINT: By the way, if you are in a position that you know you will be needing to get backups from a customer, that will exceed the size of media, (e.g. CD), here is a quick solution. Create a logical drive on a computer the size of your media, eg: 600Meg. (lets call it F:). When your client creates a backup, the create the backup file “F:\Myackup.fbk”. When the file reaches 600Meg, Navision will prompt for another disk. At this point, go to explorer, and move the first file to another folder. Then let NAvision continue until you have your entire backup. I know it seems like a lot of work, but when you just MUST get that 2Gig backup to the office, this works.[8D] Good luck.

Hint no 2: A 2 Gb .fbk file zips to around 300 Mb. Pelle

Sure, and you can set the drive to say 1.8 G to allow for safety, and then zip before copying to CD. But it really depends on the speed of your CD burner. The math is simple What is faster, burn more CDs or the time to Zip the files and then unzip them again. My time is far to valuable to waste on saving 50 penny CDs.[;)]

shame on me!

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Originally posted by David Singleton
Sure, and you can set the drive to say 1.8 G to allow for safety, and then zip before copying to CD. But it really depends on the speed of your CD burner. The math is simple What is faster, burn more CDs or the time to Zip the files and then unzip them again. My time is far to valuable to waste on saving 50 penny CDs.[;)]


Moving files between logical drives takes a time too.

We’re up to 5 fbk files now :slight_smile: If you specify afilename of ‘backup.fbk’, you will have backup.fbk backup2.fbk backup3.fbk backup4.fbk backup5.fbk etc. Another thing to bear in mind is if you have a directory path with numbers in (ie \backups2\mybackup\backup.fbk), Navision will get confused and give the error “Can’t find file \backup3…” Hope that helps.

Hi Lukask, If you read my posting, I said MY TIME. The process of creating the logical drive, and moving the files will be done by the client, and then if everything is done correctly, I will just put the CDs int he drive and be done. Simply ask you client if they would prefer to have their IT department to waste time saving pennies, or if they would rather pay you. Logically any process, especially one that will be performed multiple times, you should trrain your client to do that. WHy should your client repeatedly pay you to do something they can do them selves.